Nauvoo
Nauvoo
Nauvoo     Home Page  |  Nauvoo Times  |  About Nauvoo  |  The Back Bench  |  Vigor - Web Edition  |  Contact Nauvoo
Nauvoo Forum Post New Topic  Post A Reply
my profile login | register | search | faq | forum home

  next oldest topic   next newest topic
» Nauvoo Forum » Nauvoo Classic Forum » General Discussions » Church Service and Resumes

 - UBBFriend: Email this page to someone!    
Author Topic: Church Service and Resumes
hearserve
Member
Member # 1079

 - posted      Profile for hearserve   Email hearserve         Edit/Delete Post 
Warm greetings to all from a Nauvoo newcomer....
My wife will be re-entering the workforce after raising 6 children as a stay-at-home mom. In that time she has been ward RSPres 3 times, Stake RSPres once, Ward YWPres 2 times, Stake YWpres once, Stake camp director (for a stake w/ 15 units), and well, you get the idea. A lot of experience with a lot of responsibilities. What is the best way to express that on a resume as she seeks a position other than fry-cook (tho' she's had a lot of experience there, too! [Big Grin] ) We went over to the Stake Employment Center, thinking they would have run into this before and would have an example of how to best frame her experience for a resume, but they had nothing. Any ideas?

[ October 26, 2004, 03:53 PM: Message edited by: hearserve ]

Posts: 57 | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Tendril14
Member
Member # 709

 - posted      Profile for Tendril14   Email Tendril14         Edit/Delete Post 
I sent a private message... I just realize you wouldn't know who was sending you that e-mail and why, so I thought I'd connect the dots.

I recently had to craft a resume for my Law School application; I hadn't held a (pardon the Teresa-ism) 'real job' in many many years, but have been way huge busy in church and community. Send me your e-mail address, and I'll respond with a copy.

Posts: 2122 | Registered: May 2003  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
palmon
Member
Member # 600

 - posted      Profile for palmon   Email palmon         Edit/Delete Post 
What Color Is Your Parachute is a very good resource.
She should take an inventory of all the skills that she has learned/done during all of her years of church service. Even the things that seemingly are insignificant - like using a scanner, a fax, etc. Take as long a necessary to remember all that was done: the big projects - like organizing Visiting Teaching Conferences, feeding large groups, etc; and the little projects. Don't forget to list the classes that she has taught. Write everything out in detail. Now, this is just a working document - from it she will eventually glean information for her resume. Write out what was done in detail. For instance, don't say: Organized ward dinner. Write down what you did exactly from deciding menu, figuring out amounts to be served, located time and place, managed X number of dollars in budget, cooking assignments, entertainment found, cleanup, etc.
Don't forget to write down how and what she did in welfare: assess needs, etc.
There is so much that she has done, that I imagen when she is done that there will be a lot there.

She should also start making lists of what she wants to do. From that list, she can start pulling items out of the first that give support of what she wants to do.

Posts: 5600 | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ennui
Member
Member # 950

 - posted      Profile for Ennui   Email Ennui         Edit/Delete Post 
As one who has read many resumes and interviewed people for jobs, my opinion is that a resume should give enough information to pique a manager's interest, but not answer every possible question in detail. (If every possible question about you is answered in your resume, why would they call you for an interview?) A one page resume is enough for most non-academic jobs. If you have actual publications, more than one page is OK.

If the job has certain requirements, make sure you list those requirements on your resume. I hate putting out a job that asks for 3-5 years experience with X, only to find a resume that does not demonstrate any experience in that area at all, much less the minimum. For mid to large size companies, an HR person who knows nothing about the job will probably screen resumes. Be painfully obvious that you have the experience and/or skills that are listed as the minimum requirements for the job.

When I review resumes, I usually spend about one or two minutes on each one. Resumes that catch my attention are concise, yet demonstrate experience and knowledge of the job that is posted. If the job entails organizing large groups, maybe showing experience with planning ward dinners would be OK. If the job has nothing to do with that, I would omit it. Long, rambling resumes that list every single little accomplishment get ignored. Consider a resume as a chance to have your future boss's attention for two minutes. What will you say (write) in that two minutes that will make you interesting enough for an additional interview?

If you have a large gap of time when you weren't employed, there's nothing wrong with a one-line explanation like, "2001-2004 Stay-at-home mom for my young children." If there is an unexplained gap in an applicant's history, I think that either they were in prison, or were so terrible in a job that they don't want you to call and check on their references. Even "Unemployed, looked for work" is better than a blank.

Posts: 583 | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
palmon
Member
Member # 600

 - posted      Profile for palmon   Email palmon         Edit/Delete Post 
I may not have been clear - I was not advising how to write the resume, but rather for your wife to make a (can't think of the word,...) working document of her skills, experiences, talents from which to eventually kull information to put on a resume directed at specific jobs.

As stay at home mothers, we often do not value that which we do do. Ordinary stay at homes have a wealth of talents, skills, experiences from which to draw. SAH that have been actively serving in church have even more so - the key is the recognize how these experiences can be valuable in the work fields and how to express them in such a way that employers, hiring managers, etc. recognize what is there. Before a resume can be written, you have to know what you have to offer. That is the very first step - to get to know yourself.

(By the way, organizing a dinner for 600-1000 people is no small fete. In fact, I do believe some make a profession of it)

As far as resumes go, my understanding is that at present one or two pages at most is what is desired.

[ October 26, 2004, 06:47 PM: Message edited by: pamone ]

Posts: 5600 | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
palmon
Member
Member # 600

 - posted      Profile for palmon   Email palmon         Edit/Delete Post 
INVENTORY!! That's the word. The lists of experience is an inventory of what she has done, skills, knowledge, etc. It only took me an hour or so to come up with the right word. [Blushing]
Posts: 5600 | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
yungmom
Member
Member # 619

 - posted      Profile for yungmom   Email yungmom         Edit/Delete Post 
Listen closely because you may never hear something like this again. Assuming you have done as Ennui posted I have heard that outside of UT those callings can be helpful on resumes. Inside of UT it can be a problem with most, though not all, people who read them.

Ennui - My DH has done a lot of looking at resumes and conducting interviews the last year also. He has said many of the same things you have. They makes sense.

Posts: 5531 | Registered: Sep 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
palmon
Member
Member # 600

 - posted      Profile for palmon   Email palmon         Edit/Delete Post 
It is a manner of how you sell yourself. When you do work the the church, you don't say "Relief Society President" - for one, what is that? You say that you were in charge of a 200 member woman's organization. Or forget the woman's - a volunteer organization. Quanitifing
is very important. It is not enough to say: I managed a budget. How much was the budget? Did you save thousands for your employer (volunteer org)? Did you find a way to simplify? What did you do to stand out? Numbers, percentages that speak concretes and not generalities. Were you able to improve visit teaching by 20 percent? That could read, "Improved out reach to clients by 20%" Yes, the sisters are clients. Speak the business language and not the church language.

[ October 27, 2004, 02:54 PM: Message edited by: pamone ]

Posts: 5600 | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
palmon
Member
Member # 600

 - posted      Profile for palmon   Email palmon         Edit/Delete Post 
quote:
If there is an unexplained gap in an applicant's history, I think that either they were in prison, or were so terrible in a job that they don't want you to call and check on their references. Even "Unemployed, looked for work" is better than a blank.
Not all resumes are chronological. For women returning to the work field, it is often recommended that you not use a chronological resume. Now, if you are asked for a work history, it is important that you explain the gaps. Really, do check out What Color Is Your Parachute
Posts: 5600 | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
todd
Member
Member # 997

 - posted      Profile for todd           Edit/Delete Post 
i just copy-pasted ennui's post into a note for future reference! Well-put!
Posts: 872 | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Janey
Member
Member # 885

 - posted      Profile for Janey   Email Janey         Edit/Delete Post 
Here are some language suggestions:

Volunteer representative for women's organization (160 members)
Coordinated service opportunities such as caring for sick individuals, collecting and packing items for humanitarian donations overseas, and literacy efforts.
Organized social gatherings for up to 300 people. Planned meals, arranged for entertainment, supervised preparation and cleanup.
Counseled with individuals facing difficulties in personal, financial, spiritual, and emotional areas.
Worked with the pastor in providing welfare help for those in need.
Represented the women's interests in meetings involving men, women, youth and children.
Accounted for a budget of $xxx dollars

Stay-at-home mom
Tutored young children in preschool skills.
Administered first aid as appropriate.
Accounted for a budget of $xxx dollars.
Planned meals for ?? on a regular basis.


And so forth. There's tons of stuff she's done. What other specific skills are you looking for?

FYI, when any of my relatives or acquaintances needs to draft a resume, they call me. Tell me what you do, and I can suggest resume language for you. [Wink]

Posts: 4775 | Registered: Jun 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
palmon
Member
Member # 600

 - posted      Profile for palmon   Email palmon         Edit/Delete Post 
Janey, I can see why they have you help. You are good!
Posts: 5600 | Registered: Aug 2002  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
hearserve
Member
Member # 1079

 - posted      Profile for hearserve   Email hearserve         Edit/Delete Post 
Warm(er) thanks for all your suggestions and help. [Hat] Tis truly a nice community I've stumbled upon! Vielen herzlichen Dank!
Posts: 57 | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Ennui
Member
Member # 950

 - posted      Profile for Ennui   Email Ennui         Edit/Delete Post 
A few more things I have thought of to add or to clarify my earlier remarks:

Do not make one resume that you submit for every job you apply for. Tailor your resume for the job in question. Concisely list all relevant experience and skills, omit unrelated things - except maybe very briefly to explain previous jobs in a "history" section. Again, be painfully obvious that you meet the job requirements.

Make sure you have correct spelling and grammar. You'd be surprised at the errors I've seen.

Be honest. There is a tendancy to inflate or over-emphasize accomplishments on resumes, or to describe mundane skills extravagantly. I consider anything on a resume fair game to ask in an interview or to check on by calling former employers. Nothing kills an interview faster than ignorance about a skill or ability that was on the resume. In my company, lying on a resume or job application is grounds for dismissal. If I hire you, then find out your resume was untruthful, I can fire you on the spot. In fact, if I don't, then I can get in trouble.

A resume is a one-page advertisement. It is not a life story. But you are selling yourself, so put a little effort into it.

Forget about printing it on high-quality paper. Most resumes get photocopied anyway. But, print it out with a laser printer - it looks better than ink-jet, or gasp, dot-matrix. Don't use crazy fonts, either. Readability is important.

Posts: 583 | Registered: Aug 2004  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator
Wendybird
Member
Member # 169

 - posted      Profile for Wendybird   Email Wendybird         Edit/Delete Post 
I was just in the situation a few weeks ago, getting a resume put together. I wanted an office job so I had to put my church experience. Its the only "office" experience I had. I used Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints for the employer and Secretary or President depending on which calling I was detailing. If you'd like a copy of my resume to get ideas I'd be happy to send it PM or email just let me know. I got the best office job I could have hoped for.
Posts: 129 | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged | Report this post to a Moderator


   
Post New Topic  Post A Reply Close Topic   Feature Topic   Move Topic   Delete Topic next oldest topic   next newest topic
 - Printer-friendly view of this topic
Hop To:


Contact Us | Nauvoo Home Page

Powered by Infopop Corporation
UBB.classic™ 6.6.0