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Author Topic: Are you mentally ill?
palmon
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Shyness, grieving soon to be classified as mental illness

quote:
Whereas in previous editions, a person who had recently lost a loved one and was suffering low moods would be seen as experiencing a normal human reaction to bereavement, the new DSM criteria would ignore the death, look only at the symptoms, and class the person as having a depressive illness.
Other examples of diagnoses cited by experts as problematic included "gambling disorder," "internet addiction disorder" and "oppositional defiant disorder" - a condition in which a child "actively refuses to comply with majority's requests" and "performs deliberate actions to annoy others."
"That basically means children who say 'no' to their parents more than a certain number of times," Kinderman said. "On that criteria, many of us would have to say our children are mentally ill."




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Curelom
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WTH is "oppositional defiant disorder"??? [Roll Eyes] It sounds like what, in my childhood, would be a kid saying "I don't wanna."

This all reminds me of what reportedly happened in Greece, pedophilia being reclassified as a disability.

Abnormal is now considered normal. Evil is no longer evil but something akin to blindness or a broken leg, & predatory people are just poor damaged souls who need a pat on the head. And if those new definitions gain acceptance, normal will no longer be normal & we will be going to therapy when we cry over our canary's death or don't speak up enough in Sunday school.

Is it so surprising that psychiatrists, psychologists, various social scientists, & other practitioners of the esoteric touchy-feely arts are scorned by many people with actual common sense & real life experience? It's refreshing that some people even in those arcane fields disagree with this.

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Randy
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http://comedy-quotes.com/bill-cosby/all_children_have_brain_damage.html
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FlyByNight
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And tomorrow a drug company will release it's latest miracle drug treating all these ailments.

I wonder if a drug company is already researching something that addresses these issues. But, since they aren't "illnesses" yet, they couldn't release them as treatments. So, petition that they be classified. Then, refine the research.

Assuming I'm right, seems to me that if they had a drug treatment for defiant kids. Just how different are those effects from drug the alliance used on Miranda in the movie Serenity?

Just sayin' ... [Wink]

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LoudmouthMormon
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I've listened to NPR off and on for a decade or two. But I'm not really their target audience - they keep telling people politically opposed to me what they want to hear. And I'm left to sit there and be agitated about how they're missing the point.

Mind you, I'm no automatic fan of Fox either, or any other biased news source that tries to claim their bias isn't as biased as it actually is. Biased, I mean.

When I want alarmist spin, I have places to go who admit their focus. And when I want to hear tales of innocent woe and the problems governments and groups have in alleviating that woe, I pick targeted sources of information depending on the woe and the group.

[ February 09, 2012, 04:53 PM: Message edited by: LoudmouthMormon ]

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LoudmouthMormon
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High five Roper! I look for US news on the BBC-US news feed.
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palmon
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Well, okay then. Does Psychology Today make the cut for you?

The New Grief

quote:
The January 25, 2012 edition of the New York Times includes an article titled Grief Could Join List of Disorders. The subject is a pending decision by the American Psychiatric Association, in the forthcoming revision of its Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) to eliminate the current exclusion of grief as a result of the loss of a loved one from the diagnosis of depression. In effect, a grieving person who exhibits the above symptoms for as little as two weeks or more would qualify for a diagnosis of "major depressive disorder." This amounts to opening the door to "diagnosing" what until now has been thought of as normal grief as a serious depression, and therefore treating it as such.

In defense of this pending decision, some have argued that bereavement and depression have much in common; therefore they should be treated in the same way (including, presumably, using medication). Others argue that some grief-struck individuals find themselves going over the edge into total dysfunction or suicidality. This may be the case, but the fact is that these individuals have always been rare exceptions, not the rule. Given the way our culture has responded to problems such as anxiety and difficulty sleeping, it is highly likely that we stand poised to try to eradicate grief on a mass level through medication. Keep in mind that in today's world of defensive medicine it's a short step from thinking that someone may be experiencing some symptoms of depression to believing that they must be given medication for it.

Oh the other hand, here is a doctor that believes it should be - article from World of Psychology

Is Grief a Mental Disorder? No, But it May Become One!

quote:
There are, of course, no “bright lines” that demarcate normal grief; complicated or “corrosive” grief; and major depression. And, as I argued in my New York Times piece, a recent loss does not “immunize” the grieving person against developing a major depression. Sometimes, it may be in the patient’s best interest if the physician initially “over-calls” the problem, hypothesizing that someone like Jim or Pete is entering the early stages of a major depression, rather than experiencing “productive grief.” This at least allows the person to receive professional help. The clinician can always revise the diagnosis and “pull back” on treatment, if the patient begins to recover rapidly.

To be sure, antidepressants are sometimes prescribed too readily, particularly in a hectic, primary care setting where the doctor has fifteen minutes to assess the patient. And, unfortunately, psychotherapy is getting harder and harder to come by, in this age of tightly-managed (and shockingly under-funded) mental health care. But in cases where major depressive symptoms are present — even if they appear to be “explained” by a recent loss — some form of professional treatment is usually necessary. Remember, you can’t pick yourself up by your bootstraps if you don’t have boots!


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ketchupqueen
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quote:
WTH is "oppositional defiant disorder"??? It sounds like what, in my childhood, would be a kid saying "I don't wanna."

My brother has (had? he was diagnosed as a child, but, well, it still kind of applies) ODD. It's much more than "I don't wanna." It's an inability to control his irrational reaction to ANYTHING of contradicting/opposing just because it's "there." You tell him the sky looks blue today, he'll argue with you and say it's really more grey. With therapy and lots and lots of anger management he's getting a LITTLE better, but it's still there, along with his other problems.

As far as grief, there is grief and there is depression. I was able to recognize when I was grieving that I was experiencing more than just grief- my brain chemistry was not right and it was a dangerous situation. I did need antidepressants to level that out- so I was still SAD and still GRIEVING (I will always be grieving, I think, though less and less heavily as I go through my life) but I was not depressed, and was able to grieve healthily, and heal. There are people, like me, for whom a grief reaction can trigger a situational depression; it happens. The key is recognizing that it happens to some, but not all.

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Redd
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The sad fact is the the more society classifies mental illnesses, the more deviant behaviour will be excused as a by product of the 'mental illness'. Read your local paper...how many criminals are using being mental ill as a reason for commiting thier crimes????
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Curelom
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"The key is recognizing that it happens to some, but not all."

Very true indeed. No one wants to minimize or trivialize the extreme forms that grief, shyness, or other conditions can take for some people. OTOH, I don't think it's helpful for any mental health person to label normal human emotions as "mental illness" in ways that can make normal people with normal feelings worry about their mental health.

When people have a perfectly natural human response to the loss of a loved one or other traumatic events, they are in a fragile enough condition that the last thing they need is to hear some Ph.D suggesting, even remotely, that they have a "mental illness."

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Mormon_Yoda
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My youngest has some ODD for sure.

It doesn't matter what subject or scenario, he always has a better way of doing something you told him to do.

If you tell him to put a book on the shelf, he demands it go on the chair. Or if he puts it on the shelf he puts it sideways on top of the other books and insists its better that way.

Back to original post....just another opportunity for a prescription company to make large sums of money issuing overpriced drugs. If you followed the money I think you would find the real meaning behind this "science".

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Raro
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I cannot tell you the number of medical professionals, friends, and neighbors who urged me to take medication after my husband died. Comments usually went along the lines of, "You're already having a rough time; why not take some meds to help you get through it? Why suffer more than you need to?"
I always responded, "This is NORMAL grief! I don't want or need medication for it." I understand in situations like KQ where it could trigger some deeper illness, but I kind of got the feeling that people wanted me to take medication because it would make THEM feel better rather than me.
As to ODD, I deal with that with most of my students. Serious, constant opposition just to be oppositional. In some cases, it probably came with them at birth. In other cases, I can't help thinking the parents helped to create the issue. But either way, we have to deal with the behavior as it is, no matter what caused it.

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CookieJar
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I think there really comes a point where trying to pinpoint every single mental problem that could exist on a grand scale can lead to psychological distress in and of itself.

Sometimes we go through phases of grief, anger, shyness, fear, etc. simply because they are a part of the normal human experience. Nothing is perfect. Just because someone may be going through a period of depression doesn't necessarily mean there's something wrong with them per se. We all go through ups and downs, and occasionally we will need help to get out of those downs, but that doesn't make us necessarily abnormal or something, or that a simple pill could cure anything. It happens to the best of us.

But then again, I might just be saying that because I'm actually mentally ill, and don't know it yet. [Big Grin]

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Tendril14
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My experience in local criminal courts indicates that mental illness does not excuse criminal behavior so much as it changes the trajectory of the consequence of the behavior, namely that mental health interventions are employed as part of the sentence-fulfillment process.

Also, the more I work with my clients (I serve the indigent population), and with our Relief Society sisters, the more I come to understand that mental illness can be a huge barrier to basic living.

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